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a child in russia in just a few weeks, but a new law banning adoption of russian children by american parents has them wondering if they will ever bring home the little boy they already consider their son. i speak with them next. >>> a new russian law has left some families in the united states devastated. wondering if they'll ever again see the children they have been working to adopt and bring home. russian president vladimir putin today signed a controversial law that bans american families from adopting russian children. the law is seen as retaliation for a law president obama signed earlier this month imposing restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. they said, quote, the russian government's politically motivated decision will reduce adoption possibilities for children under institutional care. we're further concerned about statements that adoptions already under way would be stopped and hope the russian government would allow those children who have already met and bonded with their future parents to finish the necessary legal procedures so they can join their families.
distance. >> and i saw soviet union falling apart. i saw russia being totally young country trying to build democracy but also trying to save whatever national wealth was there. it was very difficult to understand. was it just gas, oil, was it rivers and forests, was it a vast, vast country, huge territory but also culture. i represent maybe not such a group of people which talks every day but it was a group of people which always reminded everyone that use your culture, it may be biggest loss you have. of course national resources always, people talk, oh, energy, of course, important important today for everyone in the world. what about culture? we think it's always important to have both. >> yeah and your responsibility is for its culture. >> i do my best and i perform quite often. >> so is your friend vladimir putin responsive to that? >> i think he supports. first of all i done see him often maybe three, four times a year, i have known him for 20 year, long before he was a president. >> in saints petersburg of course. i was rather nonman already then because i lead such an institution.
very much >>> coming up, a new jersey couple is supposed to pick up a child in russia in just a few weeks, but a new law banning adoption of russian children by american parents has them wondering if they will ever bring home the little boy they already consider their son. i speak with them next. questions? anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>> a new russian law has left some families in the united stat
couple is supposed to pick up a child in russia in just a few weeks, but a new law banning adoption of russian children by american parents has them wondering if they will ever bring home the little boy they already consider their son. i speak with them next. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. this season, discover aleve. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> a new russian law has left some families in the united states devastated. wondering if they'll ever again see the children they have been working to adopt and bring home. russian president vladimir putin today signed a controversia
and political figures. the plane was on its way to a ceremony in russia to mark the 70th anniversary of the soviet killing thousands of polish prisoners of war. when it crashed in thick fog with 96 people on board, there were all sorts of conspiracy theories swirling around. it has emerged that there were some serious mistakes made in the way the russians identified the bodies. forensic tests have shown that several people were buried in the long rates, and now more bodies are being exhumed to check their identities. >> the college president was killed with 95 others in a plane crash in russia in 2010, but in a macabre scandal, poland is still burying the dead after authorities say six bodies were misidentified and buried in the wrong graves. the first hint something was amiss was the discovery of irregularities in forensic documents sent from russia. poland's military prosecutors said they had reason to believe that the body of the country's last president in exile was not the one buried in the temple of divine providence in warsaw. he served his time while the country was still rul
to cover so let's get right to it. russia dominating our newscast this hour. for two very different reasons. first, the man, that man you see there, russia's top diplomat, he is now taking an active role in trying to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go thro
to parliament, he also said russia needed to reverse its population decline or fall apart. daniel sandford reports. [speaking russian] >> showing few signs of recent back problems, vladimir putin strolled into one of the great halls of the kremlin for a speech that cements a new era of his leadership, and he suggests head upon the need to address russian population decline, a loss of more than 7 million people in just 20 years. >> of russia wants to be sovereign and power, there needs to be more of us, and we need to be better. >> this has been a difficult year for him with hundred thousand -- with hundreds of thousands of protesters taking to the streets to challenge his leadership, and he accused the opposition of being funded from overseas. >> foreign interference in russian politics is unacceptable, whether it is direct or indirect. those who get foreign funding for activities cannot be funded in russia. >> although vladimir putin won comfortably in this year's elections, this was a crucial moment, a chance to set the tone, to stabilize the government after a year of protests and disse
of a new law in russia that bars american citizens from adopting russian children. president vladimir putin has signed the law, which places new strains on bilateral relations. >> the new law comes in response to american legislation that withholds visas to russians accused of human rights violations and freezes their u.s. assets. >> most bills signed by president putin have not been subjected to so much public scrutiny, but the ban on americans adopting russian children is controversial, so putin's strategy is to appeal to russian patriotism. >> as far as i know from opinion polls, the vast majority of russian citizens have a negative opinion of foreigners adopting our children. russia can and must look after its own children. >> at the same time, a russian judge acquitted a former prison doctor. human rights activists say he is responsible for the death of a russian lawyer in 2009. the lawyer was imprisoned after accusing russian officials of the $230 million tax fraud. since his death, relations beween the u.s. and russia have increasingly soured, culminating in the adoption van --over 7
heartbreak to some prospective parents here in the u.s. in the process of adopting children from russia. president vladimir putin has signed a new law banning those adoptions, leaving shocked adults and children wondering what will happen next. here is nbc's kerry sanders. >> reporter: cindy and dennis boyer were weeks away from adopting baby adeline. they met the almost 2-year-old recently as they visited her russian orphanage. but now vladimir putin has signed a law that despite mounds of paperwork and thousands of dollars already spent, all the more than 1,500 adoptions currently under way and any future adoptions are permanently cancelled. >> she's for a home, ready for a family, ready to be loved. >> reporter: why the new adoption law signed so publicly? russian authorities say some of the adopted have been abused or died. one unruly boy was even sent back on a plane alone to russia. also at play here say u.s. experts, retaliation. a visa ban on russian officials accused of human rights violations. >> they're retaliating by holding hostage orphans that otherwise would have homes in
? senator clinton -- secretary clinton meeting with russia, what can we do and what's the next step if they don't listen. >> it's a complex world the president is going to lead in. >> can i enter, you cover these issues all the time and did a lead story on nightly news on this topic. the question fors the president is ultimately what do you do when your foreign policy has been premised on bringing american troops home, at a time when american power and influence is needed particularly in the middle east, but there are no easy answers. this i think is what sort of calls out for an obama doctrine in a second term. he doesn't seem to have one at the moment which is a big issue. >> and doesn't have a foreign policy team yet. he's still wrestling with those decisions. more on that to come. david gregory, thank you very much. chris cizilla. coming up sunday on "meet the press," the fiscal cliff debate. the latest between house republican whip kevin mccarthy and assistant senate majority leader dick durbin, the two men who have been at the table. congress hearing from all sides on the fisc
, particularly with russia in terms of getting that message out that that's a red line that can't be passed. >> how essential is russia being involved? >> russia is key. russia has been backing assad diplomatically at the u.n. and has deep ties into assad's regime. if they begin to walk away from syria and there appear to be signals that they are distancing themselves, that will put pressure on those around assad to make sure that they do not take assad's lead in potentially using these weapons and helpses move towards the resolution of this. >> you have a ground strategy perhaps being considered and then you have an air strategy. air seems to be the one that's being discussed most because it can be most surgical. is there such a thing when we're talking about chemical weapons as being a surgical military option? >> there is not a clear surgical military it would take 75,000 troops to secure the sites that we know of, dropping ordinance on-sites that have sarin and even mustard gas and other nerve agents can be very damaging, get blown away in the wind. it's not clear this is surgical. the
in russia. >> those poor kids. >>> want to move on to the weather. lots of snow, wind, hail everywhere across the u.s. the storm that brought snow and spun off tornadoes is still not over. ten deaths blamed on the storm. more than 2,400 flights have been canceled. it could dump more snow on new england and upstate new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. below freezing in new york city at 31. just to let you know, it's not over yet. a brand new storm system set up these winter weather advisories for pennsylvania and into new york, washington, d.c., and the mountains of virginia. you can see also ohio slammed again after so much snow from the first system. so the way it's going to play out, saturday into sunday, this system is likely going to bring heavier snow to area
by russia's president overnight that bans adoptions by u.s. citizens. agonizing news for american couples looking to start or expand their families. nbc's michelle kosinski is here this morning with more. >> it more russian children are adopted here in america than any other country. we're talking tens of thousands of country over the last 20 years or so. as of this morning, russia has just made this illegal effective immediately in a sort of diplomatic dispute with the u.s. that seems to have very little to do with the children. they're like any proud parent. americans posting their stories of adopting russian children, showing their happiness on the internet. >> so we're leaving. >> this family traveled to russia in 2007 overjoyed to adopt ben. >> you've gotten to be a big boy. >> a head full of hair. >> i know. like daddy's. >> a relationship that took nearly a year to get started. >> it's a million pieces of paper. you laugh about it, but it really is quite an intensive process. >> now at home, ben just turned 7, very much an all-american boy. >> how about some milk? >> i hate milk. >
to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. and the absence of a security council resolution means the joint u.n./terribly peace mission -- the joint u.n.-piece -- the joint u.n.-arab league peace mission is at a standstill it is hard for them to make progress. if they cannot make progress, then as things began to fragment here, more people die and the big worry is that syria might even descend into being a failed state. >> and now we go to retired general james dupnik at the institute for the study of war. thank you for coming in, general. how much do we k
and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. and the absence of a security council resolution means the joint u.n./terribly peace mission -- the joint u.n.-piece -- the joint u.n.-arab league peace mission is at a standstill it is hard for them to make progress. if they cannot make progress, then as things began to fragment here, more people die and the big worry is that syria might even descend into being a failed state. >> and now we go to retired general james dupnik at the institute for the study of wa
the u.s. and russia. susan, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning. intelligence reports are suggesting as this regime gets closer to falling, syrian president, bashir al assad could release sirin gas on the people there to subdue the rebellion. this would be a new phase of the war. it has the u.s. uniting with russia to stop it and some here on capitol hill calling for u.s. military intervention. rockets streak across the syrian sky as the battle between rebel forces and troops move to outskirts of the capital of damascus. jeffrey white says it's only a matter time before the bloody civil war is over. >> you can feel it. you can sense it. looks like the regime is being defeated. >> reporter: intelligence officials say chemical weapons believed to be stored at this syrian base have been primed and ready for use. >> we remain very concerned. very concerned that as the opposition advances in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: so far the u.s. has been very reluctant to use military force to help the over
uncertain. billionaire investor and russia's wealthiest man alisher usmanov told cnbc's geoff cutmore that rebalance of growth is need. >> 2013 will be a year where we need to search for solutions. there is a big discussion going on about the state of the global economy. everyone is involved in that debate, in that discussion about wa to do. governments, central banks, economists, businessmen, scholars. so as far as i'm concerned, what really worried me and what i think is the real cause of the uncertainty is the enormous disparity that exists between the various monetary and other derivatives on the one hand and the global gdp. the derivatives, surpass many, many times the global gdp. there is too much of that. a mechanism needs to be found to reduce this disparity, minimize it. this is the cause of the instability, the volatility, of stagnation and sometimes even political crisis. so some mechanism to get out of this disparity will need to be found. and so what i'm hoping is that in 2013, the central banks of the united states, europe, and china will find a solution to at stop the g
friend was appointed ambassador minister to russia come first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time french was not only the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, they spoke french to each other. john quincy could and he asked john adams can you take john quincy adams with you to st. petersburg as the secretary at 16 years of age, and john quincy adams goes up with francis to st. petersburg and spends the year up there. it was too cold to venture out. he had this insatiable appetite for running. he studied david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and read cicero. he read english poets. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. a 69 was still studying on goal wrigley. i went to jail instead of harvard. of course a big difference. >> but i take it as a politician especially in our modern sense of the word he may have lacked a certain common touch. >> he had no common
were extraordinarily successful. archives began to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military archives. >> w bush came into the presidency. he made it difficult to get some for you could get access to his father. what is the difference between that attitude and what you have in these countries? is it a matter of degree, or do we have a different attitude? >> we believe in principle it should be open,
in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead o
in on their domestic economy, you were saying latin america and russia could be the stars in the out-- and the outperformers in 2013 s. that correct? >> absolutely. okay, there's two things. i think demand, you know, even though they say china's softening, i think actually their demand for resources is continuing to stay stable because as they reshift gears into becoming a domestic economy, they still need inputs. china is not a very natural resource-rich country. they continue to need to import natural resources from both russia and latin america. japan, by the way, is a huge story for 2013. i think japan is going to control their currency issues and really going to start pushing up export. so they're going to be pulling in natural resources from russia, as well. i think both russia as well as latin america are going to be huge performers. of course, government reform plays a big role in that. but i think that's also looking good. >> thank you, ron. so great to get your insight this morning. that's ron shaw with gina ventures. >> thank you. >>> all right. coming up on the show, want
the holidays. >>> russia's president says he, quote, doesn't see any reasons he shouldn't sign a bill banning americans from adopting russian children. don't forget as always, join the conversation. we are on twitter. there's our handle right there. we'll be right back. new years clutter is no match for someone with big ideas. with a new project in mind, some how-to knowledge to give us an edge, and more savings down every aisle. it only takes a few twists and turns for those bright ideas to make the new year even brighter. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. start fresh and save with hdx 20 gallon totes, a special buy at just $5.88 a piece. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! >>> winter storm moved across the country this week is now claimed 15 lives. the massive storm is finally moving out but not bef
is holding an unscheduled meeting in ireland with the special envoy to syria. it is a sign that russia may be switching sides to put pressure on syria to stop the fighting. margaret brennan is in dublin covering those talks. good morning, margaret. do you think this is a sign of a diplomatic breakthrough? >> reporter: norah, it's a sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. u.n. envoy to syria is flying here to dublin for this last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. russia one of syria's few remaining allies and so far have agreed to any interactions to stop the killing of thousands of people. >> charlie rose here. the reporting that they're mixing the ingredients for chemical weapons influence what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: the russian foreign minister says that the outside russian government -- syrian government assures them that they are rumors. russia wants to be part of wha
here? >> reporter: yes, gregg. russia is furious about a u.s. law which puts visa bans and asset freezes on 60 russians that congress believes were involved in some way or complicit in the deaths of a russian lawyer in jail in 2009. now he was investigating a massive fraud case at the request of a u.s. company in russia that believed millions of dollars it paid to the russian government in tax money were diverted, stolen by russians with connections to the government. he was 30 self -- 37 years old when he died and the allegations are that at best he was denied medical treatment while in jail. at worse he was tortured. russia has been very defiant in this case and trying him posthumously for fraud. the russian government passed this ban, what appears to be retaliatory law prohibiting americans from adopting russian orphans, naming the law after a 2-year-old boy who died while in the custody of u.s. adopted parents a few years ago. gregg? gregg: amy, are there repercussions here? >> reporter: there certainly are. even though this law was passed pretty much unanimously in russia's
tie onin -- tycoon in 1998. and at this moment he was the richest man in russia, but russia had just experienced its default and devaluations. so he was in kind of a bad mood. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if a man is not an oligarch, something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it, you know? it was very, very heartfelt. and he was particularly -- he was kind of criticizing himself in this because he had lost a couple of hundred million dollars because he had stupidly entrusted a nonoligarch, there therefore, not a true man, with running his bank, and this nonoligarch -- by definition, not a smart guy -- had the loss of a few hundred million bucks. but that is, you know, there's a little bit of that thinking in a lot of these guys, and it's interesting because i came across, i think there are very strong parallels, i won't have time to talk about all of them. but in my book i talk about the parallels of industrial revolution. and there's a line from andrew carnegie whi
pushing in towards western russia. the front is going to be bringing mountain snow towards the north of turkey but the south of turkey is seeing more heavy rain. very unwelcomed rain. the southwest has been getting a drenching this week. now, out towards the west we have another system coming in. precipitation coming in across the western british aisisles ann towards france and spain. this is going to be rain rather than snow getting warmer here. the frigid air to the east. tomorrow on your thursday, 2 degrees in london. 1 degree in paris but in to friday the temperatures rebound to averages. about 11 degrees for you in london so it's feeling warmer i should say. out towards the east, we have plenty of sub zero temperatures for the highs. minus 5 in stockholm. minus 5 in warsaw and minus 3 in vienna. i'll leave you now with your extended forecast. >>> we're back in 30 minutes with more of the latest. i'm gene otani in tokyo.
by the end of february. >> in russia, a bill banning american citizens from adopting russian children has won final approval from parliament there. >> president vladimir putin has already hinted he will sign it. angry citizens gathered in front of parliament to protest. they say children should not become victims of politics. the ban 1 unanimous support in the upper house of parliament. moscow sees the bill of -- as retaliation. all of us have been to london know and love the city's uniquely spacious yet somewhat old-fashioned black cabs. they are as much a part of the british capital as the big ben on the tower bridge. >> no wonder then there was a huge outcry when back in october the company making those calves filed for bankruptcy. what's worse, the london taxi company had to recall a large number of the calves once renowned for their reliability. -- a large number of the tabs -- cabs once renowned for their reliability. >> not all the caps on the streets of the traditional black cabs and more. martin has driven a taxi in london for 18 years. he would rather not give his last name because
. the president of russia has just signed a bill, banning americans from adopting russian children. and this now blocks kids from being adopted by american families, leaving russia, to move here to start a new life. abc's lama hasan has the latest from london. good morning to you, lama. >> reporter: good morning to you, josh. this controversial new bill banning u.s. citizens from adopting russian children is igniting a firestorm among human rights activists, saying this law victimizes children to make a political point. now, the u.s. is the biggest destination for adopted russian children. some 60,000 of them have been given homes by americans since the fall of the soviet union. what's more heart breaking, there's nearly 52 children in the process of being adopted by american families right now. in some cases, families who have been waiting years to complete the adoption process. so, this new law will now block those kids from leaving russia. meaning, they will not be coming to the u.s. and given a new home. and so far, the u.s. has not responded. josh? >> thank you. amy? >> heartbreaking story
pictures from russia. this is the volcano erupting on a peninsula. it suddenly burst to life, pouring who lava and sending clouds of ash into the air. experts say the eruptions were caused when a 5 kilometer crack appeared, and it is unclear when the a robson might end. that brings the program to -- end.the eruption might that brings the program to a close. from all of us here, thank you for watching, and please tune in. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in, helping to provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise in a wide range of solutions. what can we do for you? hi, neighbor! we're going to pick vegetables from our school garden. and then miss elaina's coming over for dinner. i'm excited to be with you, and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon found
of countries like brazil, russia, india, china doing a little better, accelerating. at the same time as europe is in recession. but if the worst for the happen in the u.s. and were to resolve this issue, did you be looking at a much weaker global growth, somewhere around 2% perhaps. that would be something that people would feel around the globe. a >> the united nations is officially ending its peacekeeping mission in east timor. they've played a key role in helping the bloody fight for independence from indonesia. >> the united nations has been with east timor at every step of the ways in organizing the vote for independence from indonesia and 1999. the and ran the fledgling nation for three years and send in peacekeepers to quell fighting between rival factions of the armed forces in 2006 when its current mission began. the dozens of people were killed and tens of thousands forced to flee their homes. as violence threatened to engulf east timor as it did during the push for independence. two years later, a failed attempt to assassinate the president exposed a fragile country to even more ins
is holding an unscheduled meeting in ireland with russia's foreign minister and the u.n. special envoy to syria. a sign russia may be switching sides to put pressure on syria to stop the fighting. in dublin covering talks, margaret, good morning. do you think this is a sign of a diplomatic breakthrough? >> reporter: norah, the sign of a possible diplomatic breakthrough. flying here to dublin for a last-minute meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton and the russian foreign minister. it may signal that russia is finally willing to take u.n. action to send a message to bashar al assad to stop the killing. one of april saud's few remaining allies and so faro posed action to intervene the crisis that killed nearly 40,000 people. >> margaret, charlie rose here. has the report that david martin has, the story that david martin has reported that they're mixing the ingredients of chemical weapons influenced what the russians may be doing? >> reporter: well, the russian foreign minister said that the assad government assures them that the reports that syria is readying chemical weapons a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 126 (some duplicates have been removed)

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